I’ve posted two more ghost stories from classical literature on Ephemera: a short one, and a longer piece.

Murder in Chaeronea

The first piece is a short excerpt from the beginning of the biography of Cimon, an Athenian general and statesman, in Plutarch’s Parallel Lives (circa 75 ACE). It’s got nothing to do with Cimon, but rather relates the legend behind a haunted and abandoned bath house in the city of Chaeronea. Vengeful murder, punishment and more murder permeate this bloody little tale.

Thrasyllus and Charite

Charite kisses
Charite embraces Tleoplemus. Illustration by Jean de Bosschère
Source: Wikimedia

The second piece is a much longer account, taken from Book VIII of The Golden Ass, by Lucius Apuleius. The Golden Ass, an early precursor to the picaresque novel, tells of the narrator’s misadventures after he is accidentally transformed into an ass. The novel is full of digressions and side tales, which other characters tell in the narrator’s hearing.

“Thrasyllus and Charite” relates the fate of a rich young woman, Charite, who had been held captive by robbers, along with the narrator. She (and the narrator) are eventually rescued by her fiance, Tlepolemus. Alas for poor Charite and Tlepolemus, they don’t live happily ever after, as we learn in this tale of betrayal, ghostly visitations and brutal revenge.

Do enjoy!

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